As a leading healthcare provider, we recognize our role and our responsibility to protect the health and safety of our patients, customers, team members and community. Option Care Health is mandating all leaders be fully vaccinated by September 30, 2021 and all patient and customer-facing team members be fully vaccinated by October 15, 2021.

“Our mission is to transform healthcare while delivering hope to our patients and their families,” said John Rademacher, Chief Executive Officer. “We believe our single largest contribution to eradicating COVID-19 is through vaccination. By receiving the vaccine, we are becoming a part of the solution. Each one of us at Option Care Health plays a critical role in our purpose of providing extraordinary care that changes lives.”

Option Care Health complies with applicable federal, state and local laws and will evaluate exceptions to the vaccine requirement due to a medical condition or strongly held religious beliefs.

BATON ROUGE, La., and BANNOCKBURN, Ill., Jan. 05, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Amedisys, Inc. (NASDAQ: AMED), a leading provider of home health, hospice and personal care, and Option Care Health Inc. (NASDAQ: OPCH), the nation’s largest independent home and alternate site infusion services provider, are collaborating on providing COVID antibody infusion therapy within skilled nursing and assisted living facilities, collectively referred to as “long term care facilities.” The U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued Emergency Use Authorizations (EUAs) to both Eli Lilly and Regeneron for their investigational neutralizing antibody therapies to treat mild to moderate COVID-19 in adults and pediatrics who are at high risk for progressing to severe COVID-19 symptoms or hospitalization.

On December 8, 2020, the National Home Infusion Association (NHIA) announced it had launched a pilot program with Operation Warp Speed and the department of Health and Human Services to expand access to Bamlanivimab for COVID-19-positive eligible patients residing in long-term care facilities. As an active member of the NHIA, Option Care Health agreed to participate in the pilot program to help service this vulnerable population.

Through the collaboration, which will initially be piloted in Indianapolis and Valparaiso, Indiana markets, with potential to scale to other markets, as appropriate, Amedisys and Option Care Health will coordinate to expeditiously provide care to long-term care facility residents. This innovative service model draws on the strengths and capabilities of both organizations and leverages clinical resources in the most efficient way to ensure expanded access to this difficult-to-serve population. Through its Hospice division, Amedisys will oversee the on-site care coordination for residents through their expansive clinical team. Option Care Health will leverage its pharmacy network operations to provide critical clinical pharmacy oversight and will distribute Bamlanivimab through its national network of pharmacies.

John Rademacher, Chief Executive Officer of Option Care Health, stated, “We are proud to collaborate with Amedisys, a leader in home health and hospice services, along with NHIA and leaders of Operation Warp Speed, to expand access to vital therapies for one of the most vulnerable populations. Combining the extraordinary capabilities of two industry leaders to solve a critical healthcare challenge is truly humbling.”   

“We have experience from being on the frontlines and caring for more than 12,500 COVID 19-positive patients,” stated Paul Kusserow, President and Chief Executive Officer of Amedisys. “We know how important innovative solutions are for caring for those who need our services the most, and this is exactly the type of partnerships in which Amedisys wants to be involved to help our country make it through this pandemic. We’re extremely honored to play our part alongside Option Care Health, NHIA and Operation Warp Speed.”

About Amedisys

Amedisys, Inc. is a leading healthcare at home company delivering personalized home health, hospice and personal care. Amedisys is focused on delivering the care that is best for our patients, whether that is home-based personal care; recovery and rehabilitation after an operation or injury; care focused on empowering them to manage a chronic disease; or hospice care at the end of life. More than 2,600 hospitals and 67,000 physicians nationwide have chosen Amedisys as a partner in post-acute care. Founded in 1982, headquartered in Baton Rouge, LA with an executive office in Nashville, Tenn., Amedisys is a publicly held company. With 21,000 employees in 514 care centers within 39 states and the District of Columbia, Amedisys is dedicated to delivering the highest quality of care to the doorsteps of more than 415,000 patients and clients in need every year. For more information about the Company, please visit: www.amedisys.com.

About Option Care Health

Option Care Health is the nation’s largest independent provider of home and alternate site infusion services. With over 5,000 teammates, including approximately 2,900 clinicians, we work compassionately to elevate standards of care for patients with acute and chronic conditions in all 50 states. Through our clinical leadership, expertise and national scale, Option Care Health is reimagining the infusion care experience for patients, customers and teammates.

Forward-Looking Statements:
When included in this press release, words like “believes,” “belief,” “expects,” “plans,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “projects,” “estimates,” “may,” “might,” “would,” “should,” “will” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements as defined by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements involve a variety of risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described therein. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to the following: the impact of the novel coronavirus pandemic (“COVID-19”), including the measures that have been and may be taken by governmental authorities to mitigate it, on our business, financial condition and results of operations, changes in or our failure to comply with existing federal and state laws or regulations or the inability to comply with new government regulations on a timely basis, changes in Medicare and other medical payment levels, our ability to open care centers, acquire additional care centers and integrate and operate these care centers effectively, competition in the healthcare industry, changes in the case mix of patients and payment methodologies, changes in estimates and judgments associated with critical accounting policies, our ability to maintain or establish new patient referral sources, our ability to attract and retain qualified personnel, our ability to keep our patients and employees safe, changes in payments and covered services by federal and state governments, future cost containment initiatives undertaken by third-party payors, our access to financing, our ability to meet debt service requirements and comply with covenants in debt agreements, business disruptions due to natural disasters or acts of terrorism, widespread protest or civil unrest, our ability to integrate, manage and keep our information systems secure, our ability to realize the anticipated benefits of acquisitions, and changes in law or developments with respect to any litigation relating to the Company, including various other matters, many of which are beyond our control.

Because forward-looking statements are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties, some of which cannot be predicted or quantified, you should not rely on any forward-looking statement as a prediction of future events. We expressly disclaim any obligation or undertaking and we do not intend to release publicly any updates or changes in our expectations concerning the forward-looking statements or any changes in events, conditions or circumstances upon which any forward-looking statement may be based, except as required by law.

For Investor Inquiries:
Bob East, Asher Dewhurst, Jordan Kohnstam
Westwicke
443-213-0500
optioncarehealth@westwicke.com 

October 18-24 is National Pharmacy Week. Each year we celebrate Pharmacy Week to acknowledge the invaluable contributions that pharmacists and technicians make to improve patient care throughout the care spectrum. We recently sat down with a few members of our pharmacy team to learn more about their experience in pharmacy and working at Option Care Health. Keep reading to learn more about:

  • Jamie Broome, Pharmacy Technician Supervisor, St. Louis, MO
  • Jessica-Anne Chelbda, Certified Pharmacy Technician Supervisor, Providence, RI
  • Brad Van Egdom, Compounding Pharmacy Technician, Lincoln, NE
  • Constantine (Gus) Vergidis, Pharmacy Director, New York, NY

OCH: Tell us about how you chose to begin your career in pharmacy and how you came to work in home infusion pharmacy?

JC: Prior to working for OCH, I worked for a long-term care facility where we would bubble pack medications. We also had an IV room which is where my compounding journey started. It was very different than what we compound here. The process was more simplistic, comprised mainly of syringes and easy bags of medication. When I started at OCH, I was introduced to all kinds of administration methods that I had never seen before because home care is very different than in a long-term care facility where someone is taking care of you. In that environment, I was dealing mostly with nurses who would infuse the medication for the patient. I believe home infusion is where I would like to settle in my career, it’s by far my favorite pharmacy endeavor that I’ve come across in my ten years of experience.

JB: I began my career as a pharmacy technician in a hospital. I worked at a couple of different hospitals and a former colleague of mine called me about an opening at OCH. I wasn’t looking for a job at the time, but it seemed like an interesting opportunity. I really like working in both the cleanroom and in the hospital. I had never heard of a home infusion pharmacy before but it was a great opportunity and I’m glad I took it.

CV: I began my pharmacy career in home infusion. I actually began my career as a pharmacy intern at Rite-Aid but accepted my first role at Option Care Health within the first year after obtaining my license as a staff pharmacist. Pharmacy school is a long commitment and retail pharmacy doesn’t lend itself to using all of the education I received when becoming a Doctor of Pharmacy. In retail, you only get to see one part of the patient’s picture and with home infusion, you get to see the entire picture of the patient’s health journey. So you’re able to track their progress, ensure that therapy is working, and help them transition off of service because they’ve gotten better.

BV: I’m the one who’s making the actual medication so there’s a lot on my shoulders. I have to make sure I’m making the product accurately and safely. I’m thinking of the patients when I’m doing this –what if it was my mom or dad, grandma, or grandpa?– I’d want it to be as perfect and safe as possible. I try to be very detailed and ensure there are no issues or problems when compounding every drug.

OCH: What made you decide to become a pharmacy technician/pharmacist?

JC: About ten years ago I was going to nursing school, but then life happened. My plans changed and I was doing some research on different fields in healthcare that I would enjoy. I was looking for something that would be hands-on but would require less face-to-face time with patients. I looked into a pharmacy technician training program and attended Lincoln Technical Institute in Lincoln, RI. That gave me the boost I needed to see that there were very different types of pharmacy roles across the board. It’s more than just a retail pharmacy where you would go pick up your medication – that’s not the only option you have as a pharmacy technician to find work. It seemed to me that there were a lot of different options and that I would be able to navigate my way through those options as I became more experienced until I found something I truly had a passion for.

JB: I was thinking about going to pharmacy school but was concerned with the time commitment and wasn’t sure I’d enjoy it.  I started at my community college and decided to transfer in my first semester to pharmacy technician studies instead.

CV: The choice to become a pharmacist was easy. I’ve always wanted to help people, especially the sick and needy. I originally wanted to be a doctor or a lawyer but landed on pharmacy because I’m still able to impact the patient. I was also intrigued by the pharmacy growing up and that transitioned into my career later in life.

BV: I actually started my career in retail and I was asked if I’d want to move into pharmacy which wasn’t something I originally thought I’d be into. I didn’t really have any experience before, but I was looking for something new. Whenever I have the opportunity to challenge myself and try something new, I tend to go after it. So that’s what I did and I ended up really liking it. I ended up looking for something to broaden my horizons and applied here at OCH. I was a little nervous at first because it was an entirely new area of pharmacy but I’ve loved it ever since. Every day is different and it’s more varied than a retail pharmacy.  I just really like being here.

 OCH: How do you deliver hope to our patients?

JC: I think one of my favorite parts about working with Option Care Health is seeing the patient progress through the compounding process. We compound a lot of pediatric total parenteral nutrition (TPN) at our branch and when I first came to this branch, we had a newborn who needed TPN seven days a week. The newborn’s mother was dealing with high stress and anxiety, and now, it’s been probably two years since the patient started on service with us, and they only need TPN three days a week. Seeing that progress throughout the years is really rewarding. To see someone get better, from somebody who needed TPN seven days a week to sustain their life, to someone who can get their nutrition from a source other than a TPN bag, by eating regular foods and drinking regular drinks, is very rewarding. Watching the required doses drop from seven to three and hearing the confidence in the parents as they become familiar with how to take care of their sick child is just so rewarding.

JB: When we’re making the drugs, we see patient names week after week. We don’t really get to know the patients but we do get to know their names. If we notice we haven’t seen a patient in a couple of weeks, we’ll ask about what’s going on. It’s neat to see pediatric patients get off of services because they’ve improved or they had a transplant and no longer need our services. It’s nice to know that we played a part in them getting better and we made safe medication for them and made a difference in their care.

CV: Delivering hope has always been top-of-mind for myself and the other pharmacists I work with. Providing hope is letting a patient know where they currently stand but also reassuring them that OCH is planning for them to get better and sharing what that looks like. We are delivering the medication for these patients, providing a high standard of care, and making sure they’re receiving appropriate treatment while ensuring their safety at home.

BV: I try to put myself in their shoes. The people we are trying to help every day are ill and they may not have a lot of hope in their situation. So if we can make things easier for them and provide the medication they need on time, they don’t have to worry about that and can count on Option Care Health. That’s how we deliver hope.

OCH: What makes being a pharmacy technician/pharmacist at Option Care Health special?

JC: My favorite part is TPN. I’m able to see the progress in our patients and know that I’m personally impacting their overall health. One of the things I’ve recently had the pleasure of doing is working really closely with our Area Clinical Director (ACD), Craig. All of OCH went through the ACHC accreditation surveys and Craig has been a great resource. He always listens to the technicians, truly takes into consideration any suggestions we may have, best practices, streamlining processes, etc. I’ve been working with him on updating some of the forms that are used in the OCH pharmacy and I have great pride in working with him as our ACD in the Northeast.

JB: There’s a lot of trust between the pharmacist and the pharmacy technician. They oversee our work to ensure it’s accurate, but we are the experts when it comes to compounding the medication. We know the proper way to hold a syringe, we know what typical doses are and we know how to reconstitute meds. If we notice something is unusual, we go to the pharmacist and let them know before moving forward because of our expertise in making IVs.

CV: I have the best leadership at OCH. I can reach out to them for guidance or assistance whenever I need to ensure our branch has everything we need. That great leadership is what makes us special because they truly care about us and always ensure that we have everything to provide extraordinary care for our patients. That’s what really sets us apart.

BV:  The different opportunities I have here makes a real difference. I feel like we all mean something to the company and I really appreciate that.

OCH: Tell me about working in a pharmacy setting during the pandemic?

JC: When the pandemic first hit, there was a lot of uncertainty throughout the country. Working in a sterile environment, it honestly became scary. One of the great things OCH did is that they started making sure that each facility was environmentally testing their room more frequently to ensure that our cleaning procedures were working effectively. This way, we ensured that we had removed the possibility of creating any room for additional bacteria to grow. At first, things were quite nerve-wracking but seeing that we’ve been environmentally testing our rooms with no positive cultures on any of these tests really goes to show how thoroughly the technicians pay attention to what they’re doing, and that they’re being extra cautious to ensure everything is sterile. The extra precautions that OCH has put into effect have eased a lot of that worry I had before.

JB: We were very clean before and now we’re cleaning even more. I didn’t even know that was possible! It was really nice to know that I would still have my job. When so many people were uncertain if they would be let go or if they could count on their paycheck, I was thankful to know I had one every week. It was a huge relief that with everything else to worry about, I still had a steady job. We actually received a thank you note from a mom who was worried about how her child would receive our medication and the fact that we took the stress off of her shoulders just felt so good. We were proud to be able to provide the proper patient care throughout all of the uncertainty.

CV: COVID-19 obviously had a huge impact on the world and especially New York City. Being in this area during the pandemic has really changed healthcare, our perspectives on what remains consistent and any questions of what’s to come. We have enacted policies and procedures to keep our team members safe at all times: practicing social distancing and wearing masks to keep ourselves and families safe. Being in the epicenter has really led us to work better together because we’ve realized that we’re coming into work to help people and we’ve come together to support the needs of others throughout the pandemic.  I feel fortunate to work on this team in New York and to provide care for our patients every day.

BV: I am really proud of how OCH handled the pandemic. As soon as we had an idea that this was going to be a pretty big deal, we began stocking up on things we’d need to use every day. We began working on updating policies and procedures to not only keep employees safe but patients as well. Option Care Health’s leadership did such a great job preparing and handling the pandemic because it has had little to no impact on my personal life.

OCH: Do you have plans to celebrate Pharmacy Week?

JC: I was thinking here at the CMC we could maybe coordinate our outfits or something fun and out-of-the-box to show we’re united and stand out as a team. We truly enjoy what we do to keep our patients healthy and safe.

JB: Yes, we’re going to paste pictures of the pharmacy staff around the office with their face on a superhero’s body and see how many of our team members can find because we are superheroes and want to recognize our team members as such.

CV: In honor of this monumental year we’ve had, we’re celebrating it as Essential Worker Day because we’ve all played a major role. Obviously, the pharmacists and pharmacy technicians will stand out, but we’re going to recognize the entire branch. Our essential workers came in every day, never skipped a beat to deliver hope for our patients, and made sure we took the proper precautions to keep moving forward throughout this unprecedented time.

BV:  I think we’re planning to have a nice lunch with the team. It’s been a little more stressful with everything that’s going on but it’s nice to have a moment to sit back, relax, and just celebrate ourselves.

OCH: What does Pharmacy Strong mean to you?

JC: Being Pharmacy Strong is not an individual thing, a lot of teamwork goes into what we do day in and day out. Including pharmacists, we have to work together every day to ensure that we are doing everything appropriately for our patients’ safety. The teamwork behind the pharmacy is what being “Pharmacy Strong” means to me. We really love what we do here at OCH and with so many moving parts, we all need to work together to make sure our patients have a positive experience.

CV: To me, being Pharmacy Strong” means that we all work collaboratively as one team with one goal: patients come first. We come together, collaborate, and work for our patients as a team to ensure the best care for our patients.

BV:  I think that as a group, we are all strong individuals. When you work in the pharmacy, you could have a lot coming at you from all different directions and the team is outstanding. I can trust everybody and I know we all come in every day and give 100%. There can be a lot of weight on our shoulders but we all jump in to help out and make sure the patient is cared for at the end of the day.

OCH: Do you have any final thoughts to share?

JC: Working for OCH overall, I feel like there is a lot of room for growth. In general, there is a lot of room for growth in pharmacy with a lot of different roles that you can encounter as a technician. Just here at OCH, we have warehouse technicians, pump management technicians, clinical technicians who are contacting patients, and compounding technicians.  There are just so many opportunities for a pharmacy technician to perform at OCH and in pharmacy in general. When you find the right one, it’s just so rewarding and there’s no limit to your growth within pharmacy itself.

CV: Passionate people make up this company and we are truly dedicated to providing extraordinary care to all of our patients. We are all here to give the best of ourselves to care for our patients every day and I believe that’s representative of our entire organization.

BV: I think the biggest thing I want to say is that when you’re looking at OCH as a company and potential place to work, it can be intimidating for both pharmacists and pharmacy technicians because it’s unlike anywhere they’ve worked previously. It’s something different every day. You can walk in the door and be proud of where you work and love your job. Take the chance, it’s worth it.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to alter the home-based care industry, changes that agencies were already making to succeed in a value-based care model have taken on a new urgency. Innovative technologies are critical to help prioritize value-based data and seamless transitions to lower-cost care settings.

For both economic and safety reasons, home care plays an increasingly important role in minimizing risk for elderly or otherwise immuno-compromised patients, especially for those who rely on infused drug therapies for chronic, complex conditions. With hospital system capacity spread thin due to the pandemic and elevated concerns about risk of exposure in a health system setting, the imperative for keeping people in the comfort of their own homes is greater than ever.

That is what makes home infusion therapy so appealing.

Home infusion comes with significant benefits, but the industry also faces a new set of challenges due to COVID-19. Adoption of flexible, scalable technology is an important part of the solution to support in-person and virtual operations while building new processes that will chart a course well past the point of the pandemic’s impact.

With its required mix of equipment, complex therapy management and clinical coordination across many health care providers, home infusion creates strain around data tracking and operational efficiencies. To address these challenges, home and alternate site infusion providers need a software platform that is cloud-based and mobile, offers real-time communication and integrates seamlessly with other systems to provide users with a single point of access.

“As the demand for home infusion rises, the need to ensure patient safety and high-quality care will be a key focus,” says Adrian Schauer, founder and CEO of a cloud-based, home health care software provider AlayaCare.

Here are five benefits that cloud-based technology brings to home and alternate site infusion during the pandemic.

Offers easy-to-use technology

 For Option Care Health, a partnership with AlayaCare has been just what the doctor ordered. One of the major advantages is the ease of the technology, which was a key selling point for nursing teams accustomed to pen and paper.

“We needed a solution that would be easy to adopt, help us easily shift to a virtual environment and meet the increasing need for data,” says Joan Couden, vice president of nursing for Option Care Health. “The IT match was really important to us. The solution we chose had to fit into the rest of our systems and clinical needs.”

Enhances nurse-pharmacist communication and collaboration

 One of the most important relationships for optimizing outcomes in home infusion is between the nurse and the pharmacist. The pharmacist must know everything happening during the care episode, while the nurse must know all of the medications the patient is taking orally as well as what is being compounded and dispensed from the pharmacy.

Previous to its work with AlayaCare, Option Care Health maintained this nurse-pharmacist collaboration through manual processes, which “are always sub-optimal,” Couden says.

Instead, cloud-based technology produces near real-time updates to care plans, moving from the nurse to the pharmacy or the pharmacy to the nurse. Changes to medications or patient response to medications get transferred immediately.

“Now more than ever, post-acute care providers must automate manual business processes to ensure high-quality care, or risk missing out on profitable growth,” Schauer says.

 Creates consistent care regardless of setting

 In a mobile world, amidst a pandemic and a value-based landscape that rewards care in lower-cost settings, the ability to deliver care in a patient’s home is invaluable, with multiple benefits to both care outcomes and the bottom line.

But the home is not the only location where infusion services are provided. Patients can also receive care in infusion suites. Cloud-based technology offers continuity of care across settings to ensure that the quality of care is the same no matter the setting.

“There are a lot of challenges in a remote, mobile clinical situation. The AlayaCare platform allows for flexible, dynamic adaptation to the way home infusion worked historically and to how it is changing today,” says Brett Michalak, Option Care Health Chief Information Officer. “Everyone can be focused on clinical care for the patient, and not the underlying technology. And that means patient experience and outcomes are highly enabled through this partnership.”

“The technology allows us to focus on providing care in the most efficient way possible,” adds Couden. “We can ensure we are matching the right nurse to the right patient all with a click of a button, helping to minimize travel time and increase patient-facing time.”

Facilitates shift to telehealth

While this technology had great value prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, Option Care Health has seen a boost in its value during the pandemic. Cloud-based technology supports that shift — a shift which is likely to continue to deepen in the coming months.

“The pandemic caused us to look at everything we do differently,” Couden says. “When we started this journey (with AlayaCare), would I have said, ‘Telehealth is something we have to do right now’? I probably would not have. But working in partnership with AlayaCare and our clinical teams, we were able to rapidly and smoothly deploy virtual solutions that really have the ability to change lives for the better, one patient at a time. I believe this is an integral part of how health care will continue to be delivered now and in the future.”

Deploys quickly due to easy integration

One of the top concerns care providers have about new technology systems is workflow. They ask themselves, How long will this take to integrate? The answer from AlayaCare is nearly instantaneous, regardless of what technology a provider already uses.

“AlayaCare allows us to deploy the technology in a rapid manner,” Michalak says. “Competitive platforms don’t provide the integration capabilities, in my opinion, that AlayaCare can provide. The integration of the platform allows for rapid adoption.”

The needs for quick integration and streamlined collaboration are obviously high during COVID-19, but when Option Care went through a merger last year (launching as Option Care Health), the technology from AlayaCare helped the company quickly pivot, too.

“The agile nature of the platform allows us the flexibility to adjust to any evolution in our care environment,” Michalak says. “Whether that’s a merger or a pandemic, we can adapt and deploy the technology optimally to enable our clinicians to focus on care and not on administrative technology. The ease of use and scalability lets our clinicians perform at their highest levels.”

To learn more about how AlayaCare can help your home infusion business, visit AlayaCare.com today.

Sponsored article in partnership with AlayaCare republished from homehealthcarenews.com

BANNOCKBURN, Ill., Sept. 02, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Option Care Health, Inc. (“Option Care Health”) (NASDAQ: OPCH), the nation’s largest independent provider of home and alternate site infusion services, has been selected to participate in the limited distribution network of VILTEPSO™ (viltolarsen) for patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (“DMD”) who are amenable to exon 53 skipping therapy. Manufactured by NS Pharma, Inc., Viltepso is the first and only exon 53 skipping therapy to demonstrate an increase in dystrophin in patients as young as four years old.

Viltepso is among a growing number of chronic infusion therapies for neuromuscular disorders that Option Care Health is able to deliver to patients at home or in one of the company’s more than 125 ambulatory infusion suites across the country.

“NS Pharma selected Option Care Health as an option to distribute and administer Viltepso, which offers hope to patients with this devastating disease and their caregivers, because of our reputation of providing extraordinary care,” said Matt Deans, Senior Vice President of Business Development at Option Care Health. “Our demonstrated track record of collaboration with manufacturers to extend infusion services for new therapies to alternate treatment sites, coupled with our personalized clinical care, leads to better outcomes and higher patient satisfaction.”

DMD is an inherited progressive neurological disorder that primarily affects boys because it is located on the X chromosome (male gene). It is caused by genetic mutations that prevent the production of dystrophin, a key protein for supporting muscle health. Symptoms appear as early as two years of age and typically progresses to cardiac and respiratory muscle problems beginning in the patient’s teenage years, leading to serious, life-threatening complications.

Increasing dystrophin as much and as early as possible has become a key goal in the treatment of DMD. Viltepso received an Accelerated Approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) based on an increase in dystrophin in patients with DMD who are amenable to exon 53 skipping therapy; exon 53 skipping is applicable in about 8% of the DMD population.

“We chose to include Option Care Health in our distribution network because of its commitment to providing excellent clinical care and national footprint,” said Gardner Gendron, Chief Commercial Officer at NS Pharma. “Its expertise in providing infusions for complex neuromuscular conditions, broad access to insurance networks and service in all 50 states give us the confidence that our patients will be able to receive Viltepso.”

The recommended dosage of Viltepso is 80mg/kg of body administered intravenously over 60 minutes once weekly by Option Care Health nurses specially trained on the disease and therapy. Option Care Health works closely with providers to develop customized patient care plans and provide regular treatment updates. Patients receive extensive education and can reach experienced clinicians 24/7/365 if they have questions or need support.

About Option Care Health

Option Care Health is the nation’s largest independent provider of home and alternate site infusion services. With over 5,000 teammates, including approximately 2,900 clinicians, we work compassionately to elevate standards of care for patients with acute and chronic conditions in all 50 states. Through our clinical leadership, expertise and national scale, Option Care Health is re-imagining the infusion care experience for patients, customers and employees. To learn more, please visit our website at OptionCareHealth.com.

About NS Pharma, Inc.

NS Pharma, Inc., is a wholly owned subsidiary of Nippon Shinyaku Co., Ltd. For more information, please visit http://www.nspharma.com. NS Pharma and Viltepso are registered trademarks of the Nippon Shinyaku group of companies.

Forward-Looking Statements – Safe Harbor

This press release may contain “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements can be identified by words such as: “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “believe,” “project,” “estimate,” “expect,” “may,” “should,” “will” and similar references to future periods. Examples of forward-looking statements include, among others, statements we may make regarding future revenues, future earnings, regulatory developments, market developments, new products and growth strategies, integration activities and the effects of any of the foregoing on our future results of operations or financial conditions.

Forward-looking statements are neither historical facts nor assurances of future performance. Instead, they are based only on our current beliefs, expectations and assumptions regarding the future of our business, future plans and strategies, projections, anticipated events and trends, the economy and other future conditions. Because forward-looking statements relate to the future, they are subject to inherent uncertainties, risks and changes in circumstances that are difficult to predict and many of which are outside of our control. Our actual results and financial condition may differ materially from those indicated in the forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause our actual results and financial condition to differ materially from those indicated in the forward-looking statements include, among others, the following: (i) changes in laws and regulations applicable to our business model; (ii) changes in market conditions and receptivity to our services and offerings; (iii) results of litigation; and (iv) the loss of one or more key payers; and (v) the spread and impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. For a detailed discussion of the risk factors that could affect our actual results, please refer to the risk factors identified in our SEC reports, including, but not limited to our Annual Report on Form 10-K and Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, as filed with the SEC.

Any forward-looking statement made by us in this press release is based only on information currently available to us and speaks only as of the date on which it is made. We undertake no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether written or oral, that may be made from time to time, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise.

First surgery-free treatment option for rare, difficult-to-treat urinary tract cancer requires complex clinical protocol

BANNOCKBURN, Ill., May 21, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Option Care Health, Inc. (“Option Care Health” or the “Company”) (NASDAQ: OPCH), the nation’s largest independent provider of home and alternate site infusion services, has been selected by UroGen Pharma (NASDAQ: URGN) as a preferred national pharmacy provider to prepare and deliver a first-of-its-kind cancer treatment, Jelmyto™ (mitomycin) for pyelocalyceal solution.

The new formulation offers a novel approach for treating adults with low-grade upper tract urothelial cancer (LG-UTUC), targeting tumors directly with a drug that changes form as it warms and must be provided by the physician within eight hours of preparation. To ensure the drug will be prepared, shipped and provided to the patient within the required time period and in accordance with product labeling requirements and pharmacy standards, Option Care Health partnered with UroGen to create an innovative pharmacy solution to support Jelmyto via its nationwide sterile compounding pharmacy and distribution network.

Approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on April 15, 2020, Jelmyto is a first-in-class treatment consisting of mitomycin – an established chemotherapy – and sterile hydrogel, using UroGen’s proprietary sustained release RTGel™ technology. It has been designed to enable longer exposure of urinary tract tissue to mitomycin, facilitating the treatment of these rare and difficult-to-treat cancerous tumors with a non-surgical, kidney-sparing option.

Jelmyto must be prepared in USP 800-compliant pharmacies that use heightened quality and safety standards and, in addition to compounding rooms, they must have expanded capabilities and expertise to process cytotoxic drug components. Option Care Health’s national network of USP 800 pharmacies will prepare the formulation pursuant to patient-specific Jelmyto prescriptions and deliver it to the urologist within the required time period and in accordance with the exacting standards of the Jelmyto Instructions for Pharmacy.  

“Option Care Health’s infrastructure and compounding capabilities in our network of USP 800-compliant pharmacies are unparalleled, allowing us to provide comprehensive services in collaboration with UroGen,” said John C. Rademacher, President and Chief Executive Officer of Option Care Health. “Every day Option Care Health ensures thousands of patients receive their required therapies in a safe and timely manner. The investments we have made in our clinical infrastructure enable us to partner with UroGen to deliver this innovative new therapy.”

“UroGen is challenging the standard of care through novel, non-surgical treatment alternatives such as Jelmyto, which leverages our innovative technology and expertise in specialty cancers and urologic diseases,” said Liz Barrett, UroGen President and Chief Executive Officer. “Jelmyto requires complex preparation and timely delivery and Option Care Health offers the national scale, depth of experience, expertise and commitment to quality that we require in a partner to ensure patients receive this vital new therapy in a timely and safe manner.”

LG-UTUC is a rare cancer that develops in the lining of the upper urinary tract, ureters and kidneys. Every year approximately 6,000 to 7,000 U.S. patients are diagnosed with new or recurrent LG-UTUC. It is challenging to treat due to the complex anatomy of the urinary tract system. The current standard of care includes multiple surgeries and often a radical nephroureterectomy, including the removal of the renal pelvis, kidney, ureter and bladder cuff.

About Option Care Health

Option Care Health is the nation’s largest independent provider of home and alternate site infusion services. With over 5,000 teammates, including approximately 2,900 clinicians, we work compassionately to elevate standards of care for patients with acute and chronic conditions in all 50 states. Through our clinical leadership, expertise and national scale, Option Care Health is re-imagining the infusion care experience for patients, customers and employees. To learn more, please visit our website at OptionCareHealth.com.

About UroGen Pharma Ltd.
UroGen is a biopharmaceutical company dedicated to building novel solutions that treat specialty cancers and urologic diseases because patients deserve better options. UroGen has developed RTGel™ reverse-thermal hydrogel, a proprietary sustained release, hydrogel-based platform technology that has the potential to improve therapeutic profiles of existing drugs. UroGen’s sustained release technology is designed to enable longer exposure of the urinary tract tissue to medications, making local therapy a potentially more effective treatment option. UroGen’s approved Jelmyto™ (mitomycin) for pyelocalyceal solution, and pipeline treatment UGN-102 (mitomycin) for intravesical solution are designed to ablate tumors by non-surgical means and to treat several forms of non-muscle invasive urothelial cancer, including low-grade upper tract urothelial cancer and low-grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, respectively. UroGen is headquartered in Princeton, NJ with operations in Israel. Visit www.urogen.com to learn more or follow us on Twitter, @UroGenPharma.

Forward-Looking Statements – Safe Harbor

This press release may contain “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements can be identified by words such as: “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “believe,” “project,” “estimate,” “expect,” “may,” “should,” “will” and similar references to future periods. Examples of forward-looking statements include, among others, statements we may make regarding future revenues, future earnings, regulatory developments, market developments, new products and growth strategies, integration activities and the effects of any of the foregoing on our future results of operations or financial conditions.

Forward-looking statements are neither historical facts nor assurances of future performance. Instead, they are based only on our current beliefs, expectations and assumptions regarding the future of our business, future plans and strategies, projections, anticipated events and trends, the economy and other future conditions. Because forward-looking statements relate to the future, they are subject to inherent uncertainties, risks and changes in circumstances that are difficult to predict and many of which are outside of our control. Our actual results and financial condition may differ materially from those indicated in the forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause our actual results and financial condition to differ materially from those indicated in the forward-looking statements include, among others, the following: (i) changes in laws and regulations applicable to our business model; (ii) changes in market conditions and receptivity to our services and offerings; (iii) results of litigation; and (iv) the loss of one or more key payers; and (v) the spread and impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. For a detailed discussion of the risk factors that could affect our actual results, please refer to the risk factors identified in our SEC reports, including, but not limited to our Annual Report on Form 10-K and Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, as filed with the SEC.

Any forward-looking statement made by us in this press release is based only on information currently available to us and speaks only as of the date on which it is made. We undertake no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether written or oral, that may be made from time to time, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise.

National Nurses Week is celebrated each year beginning on May 6 and ending on May 12, Florence Nightengale’s birthday, since 1990. The nurses at Option Care Health deliver hope every day through the extraordinary care they provide our patients. We realized that what makes our nurses so special is that they’re actually superheroes in scrubs.

We took a moment to learn more from four of our nurses on the front lines of patient care every day:

  • Kerrie Hollifield, Regional Nurse Manager in Norfolk, VA
  • Eileen Atwood, Clinical Care Transition Specialist in Austin, TX
  • Crystal Griffin, Infusion Nurse in New York City
  • Matt Battson, infusion Nurse in Cincinnati, OH

 The following interview highlights just a small fraction of the extraordinary men and women here at Option Care Health.

OCH: When did you know you wanted to be a nurse?

KH: I think I was about 16 years old; I’m from a small town in Michigan and had multiple trips to the ER so I really got to know the ER nurse, Jonie. I told my mom that’s what I wanted to do – become a nurse.

EA: I knew I wanted to be a nurse when I was a little kid, I don’t remember the age. I was in elementary school, probably third or fourth grade. I knew I wanted to work in healthcare and the nurse was the practical choice for me. I always wanted to help people and being a nurse was just what I’ve always wanted to do.

CG: For me, I have always been interested in healthcare and my journey brought me to nursing. Now, I can’t imagine doing anything else.

MB: When I was in high school I was going to join the military in healthcare. Plans changed and that didn’t happen but the journey really came full circle when my daughter was diagnosed with liver cancer when she was a year and a half. Going through that process, interacting with the doctors and nurses that helped take care of her, us as a family, helped me rediscover my passion for nursing, and that was it.

OCH: What does your career as a nurse look like – graduation to first job to infusion?

KH: I began my career with three nursing jobs: two home healthcare agencies and in a hospital in Detroit. When I went to nursing school we didn’t get experience putting in IVs and an LPN asked me to go out and draw blood on a patient. After I successfully collected the samples, I realized that was what I wanted to do so I started doing the IVs in the hospital before transitioning into infusion nursing and eventually to my current role where I serve as an IV Nurse Manager..

EA: I began my career as a NICU nurse before transitioning into field infusion nursing for pediatric patients and cardiovascular home care. I came to Option Care Health in a nurse liaison role helping patients transition from the hospital to their home.

CG: I’ve always been into some form of healthcare. I started my career really as a dancer and a choreographer really focusing on mental health. That turned into a job with special needs children and then I began working with elderly, special needs adults before I became med certified and finally received my LPN.

MB: I actually began my career as an aide in a nursing home in high school before I became a chef and began working down the path of opening my own restaurant. Once everything happened with my daughter though, I realized being a nurse was what I was meant to be. Therefore, I put myself through nursing school and am working on my bachelor’s degree today.

OCH: How long have you been with OCH? What drew you to OCH and what keeps you here?

KH: I’ve been with Option Care Health for 18 years. I originally started because of the nurse in charge of the business at the time. I respected her so much and decided I’d like to work for her so I joined the company and stayed because of the great people. Here in Norfolk, we’ve worked together for so long, we’re like a family.

EA: I initially came to Option Care Health because of the people – they just loved working here. I love having autonomy out in the field, not working 12-hour shifts but being able to help teach these patients when they have no idea what they’re doing or how they can do it at home, it’s just a rewarding aspect of nursing.

CG: I’ve been with Option Care Health for about four years, ever since I’d heard how rewarding infusion nursing was as a career. I had been doing dialysis but I was looking for something that would use both my technical skills and my bedside manner. This company has been so good to me; the people are extremely supportive and always make sure I have everything I need to do my job safely. I don’t feel like I’m working, I love it that much.

MB: I’ve been with OCH for about five years and I think I stay because of my manager and the people I work with. I also love my patients, I get to know them on a deeper, personal level and I’m able to help them because of the amount of time I’m able to spend with them.

OCH: In your opinion, what makes nursing at OCH special?

KH: Besides many of us being certified infusion nurses, we’re allowed to take the time we need with the patients to make sure they are comfortable. We’re able to do the teaching that allows them to be comfortable in their home or an Option Care Health Infusion Suite (AIS) with whatever therapy they are receiving.

EA: Everyone has the same goal. We work together as a team and we just want the same things no matter what area of the business you’re in. It’s all about the patient and making sure they’re taken care of – someone always has your back, people are open to ideas and you’re not alone out there.

CG: The term above and beyond exemplifies the nurses here. Every nurse will always go above and beyond to serve the needs of the patient and help the organization move forward. There’s nothing we wouldn’t do for our patients. I have an example, last week a nurse, Kim, came to New York City from Buffalo during height of COVID with bells and whistles on to help us for the week. That’s the kind of thing that makes OCH different.

MB: This is a unique environment that we all work independently, we’re not working side by side with our coworkers. However, I’ve never met any of our nurses that wouldn’t be willing to go the extra mile to help to provide the extraordinary care our patients deserve. That is truly unique to OCH and it’s very special to find people who are truly willing to help no matter what.

OCH: How do you plan to celebrate yourself during national nurses week?

KH: I haven’t really given it much thought. For me, what I do for peace and quiet is to go fishing.

EA: I don’t usually do anything because it’s my job, it’s all I’ve known. I just carry on and make sure the patients are taken care of, that’s my celebration. I don’t need recognition for something I enjoy doing, I truly get that when I’m caring for patients every day.

CG: I’ll probably do a Zoom with my family without interruptions. It may not sound like a lot but I just lost my grandmother over the weekend and taking time with my family that’s filled with joy amid all the negativity, it just fuels me. Even the fact that we’re social distancing and visiting in that way, it makes a big difference for me.

MB: Honestly, I don’t need any accolades or celebration, I truly enjoy what I do and it feels like it’s what I was meant to do. Being able to provide care for my patients is the only celebration I need.

OCH: What does it mean to you, to be providing extraordinary care during an unprecedented time like the one we’re currently in?

KH: I think for us, we have moved many of our patients into our infusion centers. I’ve been able to communicate with our patients and explain why coming to an AIS is lowering risk because of our cleaning procedures between patients. We are also able to lower the risk of exposure by not going into multiple houses to provide care. It’s the first time we’ve ever had to do this but it has been successful  It’s working so far and we’re maintaining the health of our patients with their care at the forefront of what we do.

EA: I’m still able to get into the hospitals to teach but the biggest thing is not portraying fear to anyone. To me, the challenge is bridging the gap for the family and the patient. I had a patient the other day who was in the hospital for 11 days, alone. I had to help the family and the patient feel connected with their care, navigate the discharge process, manage the patient’s care after they returned home and help them believe that they successfully provide that care in their home.

CG: I build my happiness around my intentions. My intention is that every patient we care for comes away with an experience that was the same or better before COVID-19. Of course we are implementing safety measures that are different than before but I hope the quality of their care is being maintained or even better than before. I want Option Care Health to be known as a company that cares right now and throughout everything that happens after today.

OCH: What advice you have for people wanting to celebrate everything front line workers are doing during this pandemic?

KH: I enjoy the simple thank you’s. I am glad I’m a nurse, the most trusted profession; I just think the simple thank you’s go a really long way.

EA: What means the most to me is just saying thank you, you’ve made a difference and thank you. That’s all I need.

CG: This is a funny thing because when I got into nursing, I realized that my “applause” comes from within. When a patient is discharged, that is all I need to hear – Thank you for all you’ve done.

MB: I suppose, just a simple thank you. Honestly, that’s more than enough; I do what I do because I love what I do.

Globally, the nursing profession is celebrating a milestone in 2020, as the World Health Organization declares it the International Year of the Nurse and Midwife in honor of the 200th anniversary of the birth of Florence Nightingale.

Thank you for all you do for patients across the country today and every day. Happy Nurses Week.

 

 

Republished with permission from AISHealth.com

With numerous hospitals focused on the COVID-19 pandemic and many areas under stay-at-home mandates, home infusion is more important than ever. Changes within the industry already have been seen, and the current situation is likely to result in permanent shifts within the home infusion space.

“If you can do infusion at home, you need to do it there,” maintains Ashraf Shehata, KPMG national sector leader for Healthcare & Life Sciences. “This is about controlling infection risk in the near term, and many home infusion candidates are in a high-risk category. Longer term, there has been a shift toward delivering care in the most economical and clinically appropriate setting, largely driven by payers.”

“We have seen an increase in some home infusion utilization of select therapies in certain markets where patient administration sites of care are shifting from the acute care or hospital outpatient setting to the home, related to the pandemic,” says Drew Walk, CEO of Soleo Health. “We have also seen a significant reduction in other therapies due to the postponement of non-COVID-related procedures in health systems and provider offices.”

Walk tells AIS Health that while the types of drugs being administered at home have been fairly consistent with what were administered before the pandemic, he’s seen “a broader opportunity to provide first dosing in the home, which may have been offered only in a controlled setting previously.”

“Antibiotics/antivirals, pain management, total parenteral nutrition and [intravenous immune globulin] are currently the most common treatments given through home infusion,” says Shehata, adding that other therapies may be administered at home but “that depends upon the circumstances, such as the medication and the risk to the patient.”

Lee Newcomer, M.D., principal at Lee N. Newcomer Consulting LLC, says a shift to home infusion “will be relatively small” and would be done for two main reasons: avoiding exposure to people who may be infected and bringing down the overhead cost of hospitals or clinics. “The shift is limited by the small number of medications that don’t require physician proximity for side effect management,” he says.

According to Harriet Booker, chief operating officer of Option Care Health, Inc., “Option Care Health’s business model, built around a national network of compounding pharmacies, is designed to bring care to patients right when they need it — which often means delivering complex care with compounded pharmacy medications within hours of a patient discharging from a hospital. And the pandemic really has changed nothing about that, other than our need to ensure we are prepared to meet changing demand and variability in referral volumes.”

She says that the company’s standard operating processes “include comprehensive network and business continuity plans, which ensure our ability to provide infusion pharmacy and nursing care to patients on a consistent and reliable basis nationwide, especially during this pandemic. This real-time agility employs added shifts, remote staffing rotations and expanded pharmacy hours to compound and administer vital medications.”

Option Care Health has been working with hospitals to help them “free up beds in advance of an influx of COVID-19 patients or simply when and where they need it,” Booker says, including identifying conditions that may be treated at home or in an infusion suite and coordinating ongoing care for patients who may be discharged safely.

“Our network of compounding pharmacies allows us to develop care plans personalized to each patient, providing customized medications and supplies that are sent right to their home or administered in the infusion suite,” Booker tells AIS Health. “Our efforts are not only freeing up beds for COVID-19 patients but are getting infusion patients safely and efficiently into more comfortable settings and even preventing hospital admissions from the start.”

Some Services Moved to Virtual Setting

The company also has moved some of its services to a virtual setting, including “remote triaging, patient education and teaching, nurse oversight and assistance to discharge planners and patients.” And Option Care Health has reallocated some of its 2,900 infusion nurses and pharmacy clinicians to places with the greatest need, such as New York, New Jersey and Connecticut.

In such a highly contagious environment, the company is taking numerous precautions to help reduce the potential for COVID infections in both its employees and patients. “We are closely following CDC guidelines and are updating our plans, policies and guidelines as often as needed to ensure our employees’ safety and that of our patients, especially during this time of COVID-19 where conditions are changing rapidly,” says Booker. “We have a standing call daily to assess new COVID-19 related data and discuss how to adapt our PPE [i.e., personal protective equipment] supply accordingly. Due to our national network and a long-standing relationship with suppliers, we have an ample PPE supply and are constantly monitoring it to make sure our employees have everything they need to deliver safe treatment to patients.”

Shift to Home Has Been in Place

Some plans already have been shifting administration of certain therapies to patient homes and provider offices, which are more cost-effective settings than hospitals, points out Elan Rubinstein, Pharm.D., EB Rubinstein Associates. The 10th edition of Magellan Rx Management’s Medical Pharmacy Trend Report found that among 54 payer respondents, 39% had a mandatory site-of-service program in place in 2019. Among the members shifted into such a program, 34% were shifted into the home infusion setting.

“There could be more home infusion, with drugs that pose low risk of serious adverse events during or immediately after infusion or where a patient tolerated prior infusions of these drugs with no or minimal difficulty,” says Rubinstein. “With respect to patients receiving chemotherapy, a move to home infusion would require a way to manage performance and evaluation of laboratory tests to assess the safety and appropriateness of the intended drug therapy and a decision prior to infusion to change dosage, change drugs, go ahead or hold off.”

Lisa Kennedy, Ph.D., chief economist and managing principal at Innopiphany LLC, points out that while CMS has changed some policies in support of home infusion, “not everyone is on board.” She notes that the Community Oncology Alliance “has raised safety concerns about home infusion centered on a lack of training of those in the community administering treatment at home versus trained oncology nurses.”

Conversely, the National Home Infusion Association “is strongly supportive of home infusion as a viable option for keeping patients safe,” says Kennedy. She also points out that guidelines from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) say that providers should “consider whether home infusion of chemotherapy drugs is medically and logistically feasible for the patient, medical team and caregivers.”

In these guidelines, she says, “ASCO raises the key challenge here, which is how to take a system, process and resource designed to be administered in one setting and then move it to a home setting. It may not be feasible because of training of new staff, available resources, travel constraints, insurance and other logistics that mean that it just can’t be scaled properly. So it really depends on the situation, geography and capability of the center.”

Patients May Like Convenience

“Going forward there will be a lot of candidates for home infusion, and some customers/patients may like the convenience of getting care at home,” says Shehata. Investor respondents to the survey on which the 2020 KPMG Healthcare and Life Sciences Investment Outlook was based “saw a good opportunity in home health care, and that survey was taken before COVID-19. The burden on health systems is going to test new care models and open up more possibilities tied to home health care, including infusion.”

Alternative Care Models May Be Option

“The use of home infusion will also depend upon the nature of the medications used and the amount of time it takes to infuse the drug — anywhere from a half hour to four hours — and any specific handling requirements,” Shehata says. “There might be opportunities for alternative care models to be introduced here. The ability for nurses to teach patients how to self-administer the medicines is an important facet to this.

“However, some patients undergoing infusions of certain medications need to have vital signs tracked and need monitoring for adverse reactions,” he continues. “One option is to use telehealth with telemetry to remotely track a patient’s vital signs to ensure that patients are not suffering from adverse events while undergoing infusion. Another option is the nurse administering the drug can also leave the patient with a cell phone to call if there is any problem with a medication that requires several hours of infusion time. The response time has to be acceptable, and clinical risk has to be appropriate in these matters.”

Steven F. Robins, managing partner and principal at The New England Consulting Group, says while most infusions will still be administered in traditional sites such as hospitals and outpatient clinics, “there will be an evolution towards moving a number of chronic treatments to the home,” including dialysis, a shift that he says already was occurring before the pandemic. “In order for this shift to be significant, however, there will need to be improvements across the integration of smart technologies, including HIPAA-compliant integration of remote equipment and patient monitoring. It is important to remember that during the COVID-19 crisis, some of these requirements have been relaxed.”

Robins tells AIS Health that “we also expect to see a number of diagnostic procedures that are conducted by labs or in providers’ offices move into the home setting. This will result from a combination of emerging technologies integrated with smartphones, as well as providers starting to offer in-home options like mobile imaging stations that can be easily cleaned as they move from patient home to patient home.”

“The outpatient or infusion center-based model is great, but it is going to need multiple approaches tied to the complexity of treatment and also the consistency of treatment. The problem is that the current model is based on convenience for the health system,” asserts Shehata. “This could require some changes in the pharmaceutical supply chain to have the medications delivered at home rather than the infusion center or hospital, but a number of specialty pharmacies manage this process. Home delivery also can help patients who have transportation issues. Having care delivered at the home may also have the net effect of improving medication adherence.”

Contact Booker through Jonathan Durrbeck at JDurrbeck@pcipr.com, Kennedy at lisa.kennedy@innopiphany.com, Newcomer at leenewcomer1@gmail.com, Robins via Renee E. Paul at rep@necg.net, Rubinstein at elan.b.rubinstein@gmail.com, Shehata through Bill Borden at wborden@kpmg.com and Walk through Susan Turkell at sturkell@pairelations.com.
by Angela Maas

Ensuring Patient Safety and Continuity of Care is Key During COVID-19 Public Health Crisis as Hospitals Face Unprecedented Challenges

BANNOCKBURN, Ill., April 22, 2020 –  Regence and Option Care Health, Inc. (“Option Care Health”) (NASDAQ: OPCH) today announced an expanded partnership to ease access to care and provide additional options for high-risk patients who rely on infusion therapy. This collaboration enables Regence Health Plan members who currently receive their infusion therapy services in a hospital outpatient setting the ability to transition care to their home or an Option Care Health Infusion Suite.

Regence is committed to helping ease the burden on hospitals during the COVID-19 pandemic and ensuring its members and their families have the clinical care support they need, provided in the comfort, convenience and safety of a preferred location. Regence is a family of health plans in Oregon, Idaho, Utah and select counties in Washington, each an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association dedicated to making healthcare better, simpler and more affordable.

“Ensuring our members have convenient access to care in a safe and affordable setting is our top priority,” said Kerry Bendel, Regence’s Chief Pharmacy Officer. “Option Care Health’s 40-years of experience focused solely on infusion therapy makes them the right partner to help protect the health and safety of our members, their families and our community during the unprecedented challenges created by the COVID-19 crisis.”

The partnership – which builds on Regence’s existing Site of Care program – helps address changing needs during the COVID-19 pandemic, allowing for greater flexibility for hospitals, physicians and patients who rely on infusion therapies for a wide variety of acute and chronic needs, from nutrition support and immune disorders to infections and neurologic conditions.

“Infusion provided safely and effectively at home or an infusion suite is more vital to our nation’s health system and patients than ever before,” said John C. Rademacher, President and Chief Executive Officer of Option Care Health. “As we face this public health crisis, it is critical that we work together to continue delivering trusted clinical care that expands the overall capacity of our healthcare system.”

Option Care Health follows rigorous guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to ensure the safety of patients and staff. These measures include comprehensive training of employees, strict protocols for infection control at home and infusion suites, screening of staff and patients for COVID-19 symptoms, ongoing virus-specific updates and education and the use of personal protection equipment (PPE). Employees can call the Option Care Health COVID-19 hotline 24/7 to address questions regarding their health or a patient’s health.

Care managers and clinicians will contact high-risk Regence members to ensure they know about the option to receive infusion therapy care in an alternate setting. Option Care Health clinical teams will coordinate transitions of care and customize treatment plans to suit the specific needs of each patient, with an assigned nurse and pharmacist to monitor treatment. Experienced clinicians and nurses are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year to answer questions and provide support for patients, families and providers.

For more information on the Option Care Health and Regence response to the COVID-19 pandemic, visit optioncarehealth.com/coronavirus and regence.com/member/health-lifestyle/coronavirus-covid-19.

About Option Care Health

Option Care Health is the nation’s largest independent provider of home and alternate site infusion services. With over 5,000 teammates, including 2,900 clinicians, we work compassionately to elevate standards of care for patients with acute and chronic conditions in all 50 states. Through our clinical leadership, expertise and national scale, Option Care Health is re-imagining the infusion care experience for patients, customers and employees. To learn more, please visit our website at OptionCareHealth.com.

About Regence

Regence serves approximately 3.1 million members through Regence BlueShield of Idaho, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Oregon, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Utah and Regence BlueShield (select counties in Washington). Each health plan is a nonprofit independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. Regence is part of a family of companies dedicated to transforming healthcare by delivering innovative products and services that change the way consumers nationwide experience healthcare. For more information, please visit Regence.com.